HEADACHES & MIGRAINES

Migraine headaches typically last anywhere from

4 TO 72 HOURS

Why suffer another minute?

For recurring migraines or severe headaches, you should talk to your family doctor or an internal medicine doctor to determine long-term preventative treatment.

If more specialized care is necessary, your doctor can refer you to a migraine/headache specialist or neurologist. Headaches can also be a sign of something serious, like meningitis, so you should seek medical advice whenever you have chronic or abnormal headaches.

WALK IN AND BE SEEN RIGHT AWAY

Our emergency rooms in Tyler and Longview are open all night and all day long.

Your ER experience shouldn’t be another headache.

For unexpected migraines and severe headaches that become too much to bear, you can expect urgent care and faster relief at Hospitality Health ER. We will see you any time, any day of the week without appointments or wait times. Expect an elevated ER experience all around when you visit us.

We will get you back to see a doctor right away, so we can get you on your feet quickly. When medicines at home aren’t helping or you simply can’t hold anything down, Hospitality Health ER has medication and protocols in place to address the pain and nausea.

Types of Headaches

Chronic Headaches: Headaches that occur several days in a month. They may indicate an underlying condition.

Rebound Headache: Headache that returns after taking pain medication for a headache.

Tension Headache: Tightness around the forehead, back of head, or neck accompanied by mild to moderate pain.

Cluster Headache: Sharp, severe pain that is often only on one side of the head. It is very painful, but lasts a short time— usually about 45 to 90 minutes.

Sinus Headache: Facial and head pain caused by a buildup of pressure in your sinuses.

  • Chronic Headaches: Headaches that occur several days in a month. They may indicate an underlying condition.
  • Rebound Headache: Headache that returns after taking pain medication for a headache.
  • Tension Headache: Tightness around the forehead, back of head, or neck accompanied by mild to moderate pain.
  • Cluster Headache: Sharp, severe pain that is often only on one side of the head. It is very painful, but lasts a short time— usually about 45 to 90 minutes.
  • Sinus Headache: Facial and head pain caused by a buildup of pressure in your sinuses.

Migraine headaches are one of the 20 most disabling medical conditions worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. Migraine symptoms vary from person to person, but the most common symptoms are:

  • Pain on one side or both sides of your head
  • Pain that feels throbbing or pulsing
  • Sensitivity to light, sounds, and sometimes smells and touch
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Blurred vision
  • Lightheadedness, sometimes followed by fainting

It isn’t confirmed what exactly causes migraine headaches but studies suggest they may stem from abnormal interactions with a major pathway in the brain called the trigeminal nerve. Changes in the brainstem and brain chemical imbalances, such as low serotonin levels, may cause the nerve to release neuropeptides which travel to the meninges (your brain’s outer covering) and cause migraine pain. There are several reported triggers for migraines: allergies, stress, smoking, alcohol, bright lights, loud noises, strong smells, skipping meals, dehydration, irregular sleep, poor posture, low blood sugar and hormonal fluctuations.

There are medications proven to help lessen the symptoms of a migraine, but here are some additional things you can try to help ease the pain and nausea:

  • Find a calm peaceful place to rest where there are no loud noises. Most types of headaches, especially migraines, are aggravated by noise.
  • Turn off the lights. Sensitivity to light is another common symptom of a migraine. Retreat to a dark room.
  • Use hot or cold compresses. Apply hot or cold compresses to your head or neck. Ice packs are the most common home remedy because of the propensity to relieve tension and numb the pain. Place ice in a paper towel and use on your temples, forehead and/or the back of your neck for 10 to 15 minutes. Hot packs, heating pads, and warm showers or baths can relax tense muscles.
  • Drink a caffeinated beverage. Right when you begin to feel a migraine coming on, drink a little caffeine. This can relieve migraine pain in the early stages or enhance the effects of acetaminophen and aspirin.
  • Get a lot of sleep and develop a regular sleeping schedules to help prevent future migraines.
  • Avoid foods that trigger migraines. Avoid foods that you believe are triggering your migraines. Some common foods to watch out for are aged cheese, chocolate, caffeine and alcohol.